Podcasts!

Greetings, Scholars’ Lab fans. We have three new podcasts to share since we last updated. Please enjoy! Introducing our 2010/2011 Scholars’ Lab Fellows – Tom Finger, Jared Benton, Chris Clapp, and Alex Gil. Ray Siemens (University of Victoria) and Julie Meloni (INKE Fellow at the University of Victoria) discuss opportunities and approaches for training humanities…. More.

Are you our new Humanities Design (UX) Architect?

Building on a nearly twenty-year history in digital humanities and spatial and data-driven scholarship at the University of Virginia, the Scholars’ Lab has developed great projects and hosted amazing events at UVa Library over the past three years. In addition to our current search for a full-time, permanent Senior Developer, we now have the opportunity…. More.

Are you our new Senior Developer?

Still fairly fresh on the scene, but drawing on a long history in digital humanities and spatial and data-driven work at the University of Virginia, the UVa Library’s Scholars’ Lab has developed great projects and hosted amazing events over the past three years. We now have an opportunity to add new collaborators to round out…. More.

It’s [A]live!: Introducing The Early American Foreign Service Database

It is with great pleasure, and no small amount of trepidation, that I announce the launch of the Early American Foreign Service Database (EAFSD to its friends).  While the EAFSD has been designed as an independent, secondary source publication, it also exists symbiotically with my dissertation “Revolution-Mongers: Launching the U.S. Foreign Service, 1775-1825.” I created…. More.

Open Access Week Events

You are cordially invited to an Open Access Week Luncheon Monday, October 18 at noon in the Scholars’ Lab The Scholars’ Lab is proud to celebrate Open Access Week with a conversation led by Associate Professor of Education Brian Pusser (chair of last year’s Faculty Senate Task Force on Scholarly Publications and Authors’ Rights), and…. More.

Synchronizing Development Databases

As a developer, I routinely work on multiple machines during the course of a project. One of the biggest pains is working on a database-driven project is that I often need to move the data on machine X to machine Y, make changes, then move the updated data from machine Y back to machine X.…. More.

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