DH Dev Picks

Part of mission here at the Scholars’ Lab is provide guidance for folks working on digital projects. As such, I do my best to keep up with trends in software development. For a while I’ve just been adding these to my delicious account to make it a bit easier to find references later. However, recent trends in the way Yahoo! is handling its properties (specifically with delicious), made the think a bit harder about this approach and I thought I might try something else. The idea here is to have a regular series of posts with links that I find interesting and I think are are of some utility to other DH developers.

  • Awesome Fontstacks: If you’re a developer who does design, or a designer who codes, browser support for beautiful fonts opens a lot of doors for creating compelling presentations of your work.
  • Using Git to manage a web site: Web workflows vary widely, but wouldn’t it be nice to use your SCM for deploying your web application? This post describes a method of using git to deploy web pages.
  • Getting Comfortable With SSH: I use keys, aliases, and remote tunneling as part of my workflow, and this post provides a nice introduction to all of these. I would be remiss, however, if I didn’t point out something they highlight on the post: this method is pretty insecure. After you get your feet wet,┬ábe sure to check out a much more secure method over on Github
  • My Github Resume: Use github? This site does a nice job creating a resume/cv of your code commits
  • 31 CSS Code Snippets To Make You A Better Coder: If you’re like me, I can’t keep browser-specific differences in the implementation of the CSS spec straight in my head. These code snippets help. Add them to a program like Snippely, SnipMate,
    or your favorite IDE, you can throw them in your code as needed.
  • 960 Grid on jQuery-Mobile: I’m a fan of 960 grid and jQuery. While these techniques for use on mobile devices has a way to go, this technique does show some promise.
  • Maze Algorithms: Great set of posts on solving tough problems algorithmically. These are also nice if you’re not familiar with the pseudo-code commonly used to express discrete algorithmic logic. Very clear explanation of the problem and the approach used to solve the issues.

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